Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey [March 9th]

Is that a WATER BEAR I SEE. 
Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey [March 9th]

Is that a WATER BEAR I SEE. 
Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey [March 9th]

Is that a WATER BEAR I SEE. 
Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey [March 9th]

Is that a WATER BEAR I SEE. 
Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey [March 9th]

Is that a WATER BEAR I SEE. 
Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey [March 9th]

Is that a WATER BEAR I SEE. 
Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey [March 9th]

Is that a WATER BEAR I SEE. 
Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey [March 9th]

Is that a WATER BEAR I SEE.
tokomon:

yourebeauuutifulll-xox:

tokomon:

SOME of my favorite characters from the three seasons of American Horror Story. (no male characters because they are all useless). [click for clearer image]

they are all useless? EVAN PETERS USELESS???

evan peters is the most useless of all. please take a seat
tokomon:

yourebeauuutifulll-xox:

tokomon:

SOME of my favorite characters from the three seasons of American Horror Story. (no male characters because they are all useless). [click for clearer image]

they are all useless? EVAN PETERS USELESS???

evan peters is the most useless of all. please take a seat
tokomon:

yourebeauuutifulll-xox:

tokomon:

SOME of my favorite characters from the three seasons of American Horror Story. (no male characters because they are all useless). [click for clearer image]

they are all useless? EVAN PETERS USELESS???

evan peters is the most useless of all. please take a seat
tokomon:

yourebeauuutifulll-xox:

tokomon:

SOME of my favorite characters from the three seasons of American Horror Story. (no male characters because they are all useless). [click for clearer image]

they are all useless? EVAN PETERS USELESS???

evan peters is the most useless of all. please take a seat
tokomon:

yourebeauuutifulll-xox:

tokomon:

SOME of my favorite characters from the three seasons of American Horror Story. (no male characters because they are all useless). [click for clearer image]

they are all useless? EVAN PETERS USELESS???

evan peters is the most useless of all. please take a seat
tokomon:

yourebeauuutifulll-xox:

tokomon:

SOME of my favorite characters from the three seasons of American Horror Story. (no male characters because they are all useless). [click for clearer image]

they are all useless? EVAN PETERS USELESS???

evan peters is the most useless of all. please take a seat
tokomon:

yourebeauuutifulll-xox:

tokomon:

SOME of my favorite characters from the three seasons of American Horror Story. (no male characters because they are all useless). [click for clearer image]

they are all useless? EVAN PETERS USELESS???

evan peters is the most useless of all. please take a seat
tokomon:

yourebeauuutifulll-xox:

tokomon:

SOME of my favorite characters from the three seasons of American Horror Story. (no male characters because they are all useless). [click for clearer image]

they are all useless? EVAN PETERS USELESS???

evan peters is the most useless of all. please take a seat

tokomon:

yourebeauuutifulll-xox:

tokomon:

SOME of my favorite characters from the three seasons of American Horror Story. (no male characters because they are all useless). [click for clearer image]

they are all useless? EVAN PETERS USELESS???

evan peters is the most useless of all. please take a seat

(via slothqueenthings)

thinksquad:

Today marks the anniversary of FDR signing executive order 9066, which authorized the “indefinite detention” of nearly 150,000 people on American soil.
The order authorized the Secretary of War and the U.S. Army to create military zones “from which any or all persons may be excluded.” The order left who might be excluded to the military’s discretion. When President Franklin D. Roosevelt inked his name to EO9066 on Feb. 19, 1942, it opened the door for the roundup of some 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese citizens living along the west coast of the U.S. and their imprisonment in concentration camps. In addition, between 1,200 and 1,800 people of Japanese descent watched the war from behind barbed wire fences in Hawaii. Of those interned, 62 percent were U.S. citizens. The U.S. government also caged around 11,000 Americans of German ancestry and some 3,000 Italian-Americans.
thinksquad:

Today marks the anniversary of FDR signing executive order 9066, which authorized the “indefinite detention” of nearly 150,000 people on American soil.
The order authorized the Secretary of War and the U.S. Army to create military zones “from which any or all persons may be excluded.” The order left who might be excluded to the military’s discretion. When President Franklin D. Roosevelt inked his name to EO9066 on Feb. 19, 1942, it opened the door for the roundup of some 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese citizens living along the west coast of the U.S. and their imprisonment in concentration camps. In addition, between 1,200 and 1,800 people of Japanese descent watched the war from behind barbed wire fences in Hawaii. Of those interned, 62 percent were U.S. citizens. The U.S. government also caged around 11,000 Americans of German ancestry and some 3,000 Italian-Americans.
thinksquad:

Today marks the anniversary of FDR signing executive order 9066, which authorized the “indefinite detention” of nearly 150,000 people on American soil.
The order authorized the Secretary of War and the U.S. Army to create military zones “from which any or all persons may be excluded.” The order left who might be excluded to the military’s discretion. When President Franklin D. Roosevelt inked his name to EO9066 on Feb. 19, 1942, it opened the door for the roundup of some 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese citizens living along the west coast of the U.S. and their imprisonment in concentration camps. In addition, between 1,200 and 1,800 people of Japanese descent watched the war from behind barbed wire fences in Hawaii. Of those interned, 62 percent were U.S. citizens. The U.S. government also caged around 11,000 Americans of German ancestry and some 3,000 Italian-Americans.
thinksquad:

Today marks the anniversary of FDR signing executive order 9066, which authorized the “indefinite detention” of nearly 150,000 people on American soil.
The order authorized the Secretary of War and the U.S. Army to create military zones “from which any or all persons may be excluded.” The order left who might be excluded to the military’s discretion. When President Franklin D. Roosevelt inked his name to EO9066 on Feb. 19, 1942, it opened the door for the roundup of some 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese citizens living along the west coast of the U.S. and their imprisonment in concentration camps. In addition, between 1,200 and 1,800 people of Japanese descent watched the war from behind barbed wire fences in Hawaii. Of those interned, 62 percent were U.S. citizens. The U.S. government also caged around 11,000 Americans of German ancestry and some 3,000 Italian-Americans.
thinksquad:

Today marks the anniversary of FDR signing executive order 9066, which authorized the “indefinite detention” of nearly 150,000 people on American soil.
The order authorized the Secretary of War and the U.S. Army to create military zones “from which any or all persons may be excluded.” The order left who might be excluded to the military’s discretion. When President Franklin D. Roosevelt inked his name to EO9066 on Feb. 19, 1942, it opened the door for the roundup of some 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese citizens living along the west coast of the U.S. and their imprisonment in concentration camps. In addition, between 1,200 and 1,800 people of Japanese descent watched the war from behind barbed wire fences in Hawaii. Of those interned, 62 percent were U.S. citizens. The U.S. government also caged around 11,000 Americans of German ancestry and some 3,000 Italian-Americans.
thinksquad:

Today marks the anniversary of FDR signing executive order 9066, which authorized the “indefinite detention” of nearly 150,000 people on American soil.
The order authorized the Secretary of War and the U.S. Army to create military zones “from which any or all persons may be excluded.” The order left who might be excluded to the military’s discretion. When President Franklin D. Roosevelt inked his name to EO9066 on Feb. 19, 1942, it opened the door for the roundup of some 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese citizens living along the west coast of the U.S. and their imprisonment in concentration camps. In addition, between 1,200 and 1,800 people of Japanese descent watched the war from behind barbed wire fences in Hawaii. Of those interned, 62 percent were U.S. citizens. The U.S. government also caged around 11,000 Americans of German ancestry and some 3,000 Italian-Americans.

thinksquad:

Today marks the anniversary of FDR signing executive order 9066, which authorized the “indefinite detention” of nearly 150,000 people on American soil.

The order authorized the Secretary of War and the U.S. Army to create military zones “from which any or all persons may be excluded.” The order left who might be excluded to the military’s discretion. When President Franklin D. Roosevelt inked his name to EO9066 on Feb. 19, 1942, it opened the door for the roundup of some 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese citizens living along the west coast of the U.S. and their imprisonment in concentration camps. In addition, between 1,200 and 1,800 people of Japanese descent watched the war from behind barbed wire fences in Hawaii. Of those interned, 62 percent were U.S. citizens. The U.S. government also caged around 11,000 Americans of German ancestry and some 3,000 Italian-Americans.

(via gypsiedgemineyed)

vintagegal:

"Reverie" by Alberto Vargas c. 1923
vintagegal:

"Reverie" by Alberto Vargas c. 1923
vintagegal:

"Reverie" by Alberto Vargas c. 1923

vintagegal:

"Reverie" by Alberto Vargas c. 1923

(via slothqueenthings)

ukpuru:

[Igbo] Okonko, in the generic body suit, at a burial ceremony. Umueshi, March 1988. Photo: Eli Bentor

Eli Bentor, 2002

(via gypsiedgemineyed)

fotojournalismus:

Chiara Goia: Mongolia in Winter
(via 5centsapound)
fotojournalismus:

Chiara Goia: Mongolia in Winter
(via 5centsapound)
fotojournalismus:

Chiara Goia: Mongolia in Winter
(via 5centsapound)
fotojournalismus:

Chiara Goia: Mongolia in Winter
(via 5centsapound)
fotojournalismus:

Chiara Goia: Mongolia in Winter
(via 5centsapound)
fotojournalismus:

Chiara Goia: Mongolia in Winter
(via 5centsapound)
fotojournalismus:

Chiara Goia: Mongolia in Winter
(via 5centsapound)
fotojournalismus:

Chiara Goia: Mongolia in Winter
(via 5centsapound)
fotojournalismus:

Chiara Goia: Mongolia in Winter
(via 5centsapound)
fotojournalismus:

Chiara Goia: Mongolia in Winter
(via 5centsapound)
nevver:

Kiev
nevver:

Kiev
nevver:

Kiev
nevver:

Kiev

Someone wants to publish one of my stories.

Someone wants to publish one of my stories.
Someone wants to PUBLISH one of my STORIES.