nevver:

Sword of Damocles, Winston Smith
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park
on Behance , Flickr
Sunga Park lives and work in Busan, South Korea as a graphic designer and illustrator, creating architectural, washy watercolor illustrations and cultural portraits from her surroundings. 
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park
on Behance , Flickr
Sunga Park lives and work in Busan, South Korea as a graphic designer and illustrator, creating architectural, washy watercolor illustrations and cultural portraits from her surroundings. 
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park
on Behance , Flickr
Sunga Park lives and work in Busan, South Korea as a graphic designer and illustrator, creating architectural, washy watercolor illustrations and cultural portraits from her surroundings. 
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park
on Behance , Flickr
Sunga Park lives and work in Busan, South Korea as a graphic designer and illustrator, creating architectural, washy watercolor illustrations and cultural portraits from her surroundings. 
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park
on Behance , Flickr
Sunga Park lives and work in Busan, South Korea as a graphic designer and illustrator, creating architectural, washy watercolor illustrations and cultural portraits from her surroundings. 
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park
on Behance , Flickr
Sunga Park lives and work in Busan, South Korea as a graphic designer and illustrator, creating architectural, washy watercolor illustrations and cultural portraits from her surroundings. 
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park
on Behance , Flickr
Sunga Park lives and work in Busan, South Korea as a graphic designer and illustrator, creating architectural, washy watercolor illustrations and cultural portraits from her surroundings. 
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park
on Behance , Flickr
Sunga Park lives and work in Busan, South Korea as a graphic designer and illustrator, creating architectural, washy watercolor illustrations and cultural portraits from her surroundings. 
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park
on Behance , Flickr
Sunga Park lives and work in Busan, South Korea as a graphic designer and illustrator, creating architectural, washy watercolor illustrations and cultural portraits from her surroundings. 
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park
on Behance , Flickr
Sunga Park lives and work in Busan, South Korea as a graphic designer and illustrator, creating architectural, washy watercolor illustrations and cultural portraits from her surroundings.

asylum-art:

asylum-art:

Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park

on Behance , Flickr

Sunga Park lives and work in Busan, South Korea as a graphic designer and illustrator, creating architectural, washy watercolor illustrations and cultural portraits from her surroundings.

(via blua)

humansofnewyork:

“My parents were captured when I was sixteen. They both died in prison.”
“What do you remember about the day they were taken?”
“I’m sorry. I don’t think I can do this. Can we stop?” 
(Shaqlawa, Iraq)

(via willisfree)

“It is almost as if happiness is an acquired taste, like coconut cordial or ceviche, to which you can eventually become accustomed, but despair is something surprising each time you encounter it.”
— Lemony Snicket, The End (via observando)

(via nminusone)

“I wonder if the artist ever lives his life — he is too busy recreating it. To create is to live. Only as I write do I realize myself. I don’t know what that does to “life”.”
Anne Sexton, from A Self-Portrait In Letters (via violentwavesofemotion)

The reason why I refuse to take existentialism as just another French fashion or historical curiosity, is that I think it has something very important to offer us for the new century. I’m afraid we’re losing the real virtues of living life passionately in the sense of taking responsibility for who you are, the ability to make something of yourself and feeling good about life. Existentialism is often discussed as if it’s a philosophy of despair, but I think the truth is just the opposite. Sartre once interviewed said, he never really felt a day of despair in his life. But one thing that comes out from reading these guys is not a sense of anguish about life so much as a real kind of exuberance, a feeling on top of it. It’s like your life is yours to create.

I’ve read the post-modernists with some interest, even admiration, but when I read them I always have this awful nagging feeling that something absolutely essential is getting left out. The more that you talk about a person as a social construction, or as a confluence of forces, or as fragmented or marginalized, what you do is you open up a whole new world of excuses. And when Sartre talks about responsibility, he’s not talking about something abstract. He’s not talking about the kind of self or soul that theologians would argue about. It’s something very concrete. It’s you and me talking, making decisions, doing things, and taking the consequences.

It might be true that there are six billion people in the world, and counting. Nevertheless — what you do makes a difference. It makes a difference, first of all, in material terms. It makes a difference to other people, and it sets an example. And in short, I think the message here is that we should never simply write ourselves off and see ourselves as the victim of various forces. It’s always our decision who we are.

“I would say that life understood is life lived. But, the paradoxes bug me, and I can learn to love and make love to the paradoxes that bug me, and on really romantic evenings of self, I go salsa dancing with my confusion.”

Edward Said in an interview with Timothy Appleby (1986) on the question "Can an Arab & Jewish state coexist?"

  • TA: Why don't you, once and for all, renounce terror?
  • ES: We're not in a position to renounce anything that confirms our status as essentially terrorists, which is what the Israelis have since the middle 1970s been trying to convince the world of. That all Palestinian acts of resistance are acts of terror. It's blatant hypocrisy, it's a lie, from a state that commands its bombers from a height of 10,000 feet to bomb refugee camps.
  • TA: Nonetheless...
  • ES: Nonetheless, I'm telling you about the image. Images are formed by the media, and you know as well as I do that you're not interested in covering Al Fajr [an Arab newspaper published in Jerusalem], but you do cover random outrages by individuals who attempt to blow up a bus in Israel. Have you ever actually done a body count? Have you? Have you any idea of the disparity between Israelis killed and Palestinians killed? I mean, we're talking hundreds to one...
  • TA: Why do you think you have such a hard time convincing anybody of this?
  • ES: Because we are a non-Western people from a civilization that has always been in conflict with the West. The world of Islam has always been a historical competitor, and it has never capitulated. So the one thing people don't understand is, why do you Palestinians whimper? Why don't you go away? Forget it. But we don't.
  • TA: Maybe time is running out.
  • ES: They said that five years ago [in 1981] -- the midnight hour. The fact is, every Israeli realizes they have no military option against us. What are they going to do? Kill everybody? So some of us say, WE FIGHT ON. And we keep saying, We're going to live together with you. That no matter what they do, we're a shadow.
  • TA: It seems quite clear the Israelis are not going to give up...
  • ES: It was very clear in Algeria. And they fought for what? 130 years? Then they gave up... [T]hey said that about the British in Kenya. Who could have imagined that after 300 years of colonization in India they would have left? They come and they go.