kateordie:

At least something good happened in this godforsaken episode

This scene.  kateordie:

At least something good happened in this godforsaken episode

This scene.  kateordie:

At least something good happened in this godforsaken episode

This scene.  kateordie:

At least something good happened in this godforsaken episode

This scene. 

kateordie:

At least something good happened in this godforsaken episode

This scene. 

“Under capitalism, we can’t have Democracy by definition. Capitalism is a system in which the central institutions of society are in principle under autocratic control. Thus, a corporation or an industry is, if we were to think of it in political terms, fascist.”
tracesofthevanished:

La folie Almayer (Chantal Akerman, 2011)
tracesofthevanished:

La folie Almayer (Chantal Akerman, 2011)

tracesofthevanished:

La folie Almayer (Chantal Akerman, 2011)

(via streetetiquette)

Digital warfare

freaks me out.

Autonomous drone warfare

freaks me out.

The Stuxnet virus

freaks me out.

The acidification of the world’s oceans

freaks me out.

The United States Intelligence apparatus

freaks me out.

The increasing economic inequality/ martial strength of the police force in the USA

freaks me out. 

And more and more, these days, it feels like all I can do

is be really, really fucking freaked out.

“A house full of scraps of poems, unused ideas. A nest of thoughts, the wood chips from an industrious carpenter of the word. Their abundance, like froth, around my existence, excess, boiling over. I don’t know why I sentenced this or that poem to non-being, to silence; why I wrote down this, but not that thought. All froth.”

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Obit of the Day: Gabriel García Márquez, Literary Pioneer, Dies At His Home in Mexico At Age 87

Gabriel García Márquez, the Colombian novelist whose “One Hundred Years of Solitude” established him as a giant of 20th-century literature, died on Thursday at his home in Mexico City. He was 87.

His death was confirmed by Cristobal Pera, his former editor at Random House.

Mr. García Márquez, who received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982, wrote fiction rooted in a mythical Latin American landscape of his own creation, but his appeal was universal. His books were translated into dozens of languages. He was among a select roster of canonical writers — Dickens, Tolstoy and Hemingway among them — who were embraced both by critics and by a mass audience.

“Each new work of his is received by expectant critics and readers as an event of world importance,” the Swedish Academy of Letters said in awarding him the Nobel.

Mr. García Márquez was considered the supreme exponent, if not the creator, of the literary genre known as magic realism, in which the miraculous and the real converge. In his novels and stories, storms rage for years, flowers drift from the skies, tyrants survive for centuries, priests levitate, and corpses fail to decompose. And, more plausibly, lovers rekindle their passion after a half century apart.

Magic realism, he said, sprang from Latin America’s history of vicious dictators and romantic revolutionaries, of long years of hunger, illness and violence. In accepting his Nobel, Mr. García Márquez said: “Poets and beggars, musicians and prophets, warriors and scoundrels, all creatures of that unbridled reality, we have had to ask but little of imagination. For our crucial problem has been a lack of conventional means to render our lives believable.”

“One Hundred Years of Solitude” would sell more than 20 million copies. The Chilean poet Pablo Neruda called it “the greatest revelation in the Spanish language since ‘Don Quixote.’ ” The novelist William Kennedy hailed it as “the first piece of literature since the Book of Genesis that should be required reading for the entire human race.”

Mr. García Márquez made no claim to have invented magic realism; he pointed out that elements of it had appeared before in Latin American literature. But no one before him had used the style with such artistry, exuberance and power. Magic realism would soon inspire writers on both sides of the Atlantic, most notably Isabel Allende in Chile and Salman Rushdie in Britain.

Suffering from lymphatic cancer, which was diagnosed in 1999, Mr. García Márquez devoted most of his subsequent writing to his memoirs. One exception was the novel “Memories of My Melancholy Whores,” about the love affair between a 90-year-old man and a 14-year-old prostitute, published in 2004.

In July 2012, his brother, Jaime, was quoted as saying that Mr. García Márquez had senile dementia and had stopped writing. But Jaime Abello, director of the Gabriel García Márquez New Journalism Foundation in Cartagena, said that the condition had not been clinically diagnosed.

Mr. Pera, the author’s editor at Random House Mondadori, said at the time that Mr. García Márquez had been working on a novel, “We’ll See Each Other in August,” but that no publication date had been scheduled. The author seemed disinclined to have it published, Mr. Pera said: “He told me, ‘This far along I don’t need to publish more.’ ”

Besides his wife, Mercedes, he is survived by two sons, Rodrigo and Gonzalo.

You know what’s really weird? I just randomly decided to start reading Chronicle of a Death Foretold like two fucking hours ago.

(via iwantthepharaohs)

nevver:

“I am so smart I know what is wrong with the world… Are you ready for this?”

‘An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.’” — Kurt Vonnegut, If This Isn’t Nice, What Is?: Advice to the Young

prostheticknowledge:

Quixter
First-to-market biometric payment system scans your hand of it’s vein layout to identify the customer and their account.
To those unfamiliar with vein biometrics, the way your veins are structured around your body are more unique than a fingerprint, therefore considered a far more accurate form of personal identification - video from the University of Lund, Sweden below:


Paying for a coffee or lunch by simply scanning your palm still sounds like science fiction to most of us. However, an engineering student at Lund University in Sweden has made it happen - making his the first known company in the world to install the vein scanning technique in stores and coffee shops.

[Link]
Link to Quixter’s website can be found here

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO prostheticknowledge:

Quixter
First-to-market biometric payment system scans your hand of it’s vein layout to identify the customer and their account.
To those unfamiliar with vein biometrics, the way your veins are structured around your body are more unique than a fingerprint, therefore considered a far more accurate form of personal identification - video from the University of Lund, Sweden below:


Paying for a coffee or lunch by simply scanning your palm still sounds like science fiction to most of us. However, an engineering student at Lund University in Sweden has made it happen - making his the first known company in the world to install the vein scanning technique in stores and coffee shops.

[Link]
Link to Quixter’s website can be found here

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO prostheticknowledge:

Quixter
First-to-market biometric payment system scans your hand of it’s vein layout to identify the customer and their account.
To those unfamiliar with vein biometrics, the way your veins are structured around your body are more unique than a fingerprint, therefore considered a far more accurate form of personal identification - video from the University of Lund, Sweden below:


Paying for a coffee or lunch by simply scanning your palm still sounds like science fiction to most of us. However, an engineering student at Lund University in Sweden has made it happen - making his the first known company in the world to install the vein scanning technique in stores and coffee shops.

[Link]
Link to Quixter’s website can be found here

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO prostheticknowledge:

Quixter
First-to-market biometric payment system scans your hand of it’s vein layout to identify the customer and their account.
To those unfamiliar with vein biometrics, the way your veins are structured around your body are more unique than a fingerprint, therefore considered a far more accurate form of personal identification - video from the University of Lund, Sweden below:


Paying for a coffee or lunch by simply scanning your palm still sounds like science fiction to most of us. However, an engineering student at Lund University in Sweden has made it happen - making his the first known company in the world to install the vein scanning technique in stores and coffee shops.

[Link]
Link to Quixter’s website can be found here

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

prostheticknowledge:

Quixter

First-to-market biometric payment system scans your hand of it’s vein layout to identify the customer and their account.

To those unfamiliar with vein biometrics, the way your veins are structured around your body are more unique than a fingerprint, therefore considered a far more accurate form of personal identification - video from the University of Lund, Sweden below:

Paying for a coffee or lunch by simply scanning your palm still sounds like science fiction to most of us. However, an engineering student at Lund University in Sweden has made it happen - making his the first known company in the world to install the vein scanning technique in stores and coffee shops.

[Link]

Link to Quixter’s website can be found here

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

(via we-are-star-stuff)