“When I returned from the physical shock of Nagasaki, which I have described in the first page of this book, I tried to persuade my colleagues in governments and in the United Nations that Nagasaki should be preserved exactly as it was then. I wanted all future conferences on disarmament, and on other issues which weigh the fates of nations, to be held in that ashy, clinical sea of rubble. I still think as I did then, that only in this forbidding context could statesmen make realistic judgements of the problems which they handle on our behalf. Alas, my official colleagues thought nothing of my scheme; on the contrary, they pointed out to me that delegates would be uncomfortable in Nagasaki.”
Jacob Bronowski (via azspot)

(via azspot)

“There are days when I can hardly make it out of bed. I find it an effort to speak. I feel I am without worth, that nothing I can do is of any value, least of all to myself.”
Margaret Atwood, from Cat’s Eye (via violentwavesofemotion)
we-arethewildthings:

Thank you so much, John Oliver.
we-arethewildthings:

Thank you so much, John Oliver.
we-arethewildthings:

Thank you so much, John Oliver.
we-arethewildthings:

Thank you so much, John Oliver.
we-arethewildthings:

Thank you so much, John Oliver.
we-arethewildthings:

Thank you so much, John Oliver.
we-arethewildthings:

Thank you so much, John Oliver.
we-arethewildthings:

Thank you so much, John Oliver.
we-arethewildthings:

Thank you so much, John Oliver.

we-arethewildthings:

Thank you so much, John Oliver.

(via maedaeparade)

“Ordinarily we value a work of art because of the seriousness and dignity of what it achieves. We value it because it succeeds - in being what it is and, presumably, in fulfilling the intention that lies behind it. We assume a proper, that is to say, straightforward relation between intention and performance. By such standards, we appraise The Iliad, Aristophanes’ plays, The Art of the Fugue, Middlemarch, the paintings of Rembrandt, Chartres, the poetry of Donne, The Divine Comedy, Beethoven’s quartets, and - among people - Socrates, Jesus, St. Francis, Napoleon, Savonarola. In short, the pantheon of high culture: truth, beauty, and seriousness.
But there are other creative sensibilities besides the seriousness (both tragic and comic) of high culture and of the high style of evaluating people. And one cheats oneself, as a human being, if one has respect only for the style of high culture, whatever else one may do or feel on the sly.”
— Susan Sontag

"Holy smokin tolitos" is exactly what I would have said

“I no longer have patience for certain things, not because I’ve become arrogant, but simply because I reached a point in my life where I do not want to waste more time with what displeases me or hurts me. I have no patience for cynicism, excessive criticism and demands of any nature. I lost the will to please those who do not like me, to love those who do not love me and to smile at those who do not want to smile at me. I no longer spend a single minute on those who lie or want to manipulate. I decided not to coexist anymore with pretense, hypocrisy, dishonesty and cheap praise. I do not tolerate selective erudition nor academic arrogance. I do not adjust either to popular gossiping. I hate conflict and comparisons. I believe in a world of opposites and that’s why I avoid people with rigid and inflexible personalities. In friendship I dislike the lack of loyalty and betrayal. I do not get along with those who do not know how to give a compliment or a word of encouragement. Exaggerations bore me and I have difficulty accepting those who do not like animals. And on top of everything I have no patience for anyone who does not deserve my patience.”
— Meryl Streep (via bungalowintheburrough)

(via fivegiraffes)

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament
via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

Actually can’t stop staring at this

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament

via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

Actually can’t stop staring at this

(via we-are-star-stuff)

“You know what this summer was? This summer was ISIS, beheadings, missing airplanes, airplanes shot down, religious minorities being persecuted, black Americans being persecuted, militarized police, Iggy Azalea having the “song of the summer,” Robin Williams hanging himself, and finding out Hello Kitty isn’t even a fucking cat.

2014 was the summer of existentialism, and it’s the kind of summer and cultural climate during which we should all discuss the matter of dying sad, scared, confused, and alone more often.”
nevver:

LA Confidential
nevver:

LA Confidential
nevver:

LA Confidential